IBPS PO Preliminary Exam - Mock English paper 2

View Passage

In the mid-fifties when GE was expanding its operations across the globe, the president of GE, Ralph Cordiner decided to set up a corporate university an hour away from New York spread over 59 acres. In 1956 GE offered its first course that spread over 13 weeks. Today no executive can imagine spending a full quarter of the year sitting in a classroom. While the courses that are offered at Crotonville have become shorter, the efficacy of the investment remains unquestionable. The headhunters refer to GE as a leadership factory.

GE is not alone. McDonalds set up its Hamburger University in 1961. When Steve Jobs hired Joe Podolny, the then dean of Yale to start Apple University in 2008 it made a big splash. Apple University drew faculty members including professors from universities like Yale, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford and MIT.

The trend of corporate universities is on the rise. The companies have a large employee base that ranges from 8,000 to 300,000 employees or more. They cut across sectors and businesses from automobiles to pharma and everything else in between. General Motors Institute, Caterpillar, Unilever, GDF Suez, Veolia, Axa, Sanofi, Novartis, Petronas, and many more.

In 1993, corporate universities existed in only 400 companies. By 2001, this number had increased to 2,000, including Walt Disney, Boeing, and Motorola. According to BCG, there are estimated to be more than 4,000 companies with formal corporate universities.

Scale: McDonalds serves 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets. This complexity requires training. That ensures that McDonalds burgers taste the same from Mumbai to Moscow.

Complexity: When surgeons move to the operating theater they rely on checklists. These lists reduce human error, and help the surgeon to operate with speed without having to stop and double check if they are missing any step. In performing complex tasks through collaborating teams, speed comes through training in standard processes and procedures. Apple University teaches employees that they’re at the company to be the very best at one specific task.

Corporate Governance: Governance needs the ability to manage reporting relationships, finances, and facilities. Compliance and risk management demand investments in training. On any given day two billion people use Unilever products across countries that have different rules and regulations. This scale and complexity demands constant investment to ensure standards are not compromised.

Education: Entry-level hires are drawn from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. There is a need to bring people to a common minimum level of knowledge and skills. From technical skills or domain knowledge or personal competencies, people need to keep upgrading.

Values and Culture: The leaders need to be role models of the values the company proclaims. When the majority of employee responses to everyday situations become uniform, it forms the culture of the organization. Tying the professional development to strategic challenges is a strong reason to invest in training.
The culture of the organization has to support its vision and strategy. This needs a place when people can come together and connect with others and learn. Technical training can be delivered through e-learning modules. It is the intangibles like culture that people need to learn from role models.

1)   Which of these is false in the context of the passage?

I. The pilot course offered at Crotonville was much shorter in duration compared to the executive courses today.
II. Till today GE continues to be the only company to provide proper classroom training to its employees.
III. Culture has to be learned from leaders; e-learning modules will not do.


a. only I
b. II and III
c. I and III
d. only III
e. I and II
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: I and II

Explanation:
i. Check para 1, sentence 4
ii. Check para 2 & 3
iii. Check the last sentence of para 10


View Passage

In the mid-fifties when GE was expanding its operations across the globe, the president of GE, Ralph Cordiner decided to set up a corporate university an hour away from New York spread over 59 acres. In 1956 GE offered its first course that spread over 13 weeks. Today no executive can imagine spending a full quarter of the year sitting in a classroom. While the courses that are offered at Crotonville have become shorter, the efficacy of the investment remains unquestionable. The headhunters refer to GE as a leadership factory.

GE is not alone. McDonalds set up its Hamburger University in 1961. When Steve Jobs hired Joe Podolny, the then dean of Yale to start Apple University in 2008 it made a big splash. Apple University drew faculty members including professors from universities like Yale, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford and MIT.

The trend of corporate universities is on the rise. The companies have a large employee base that ranges from 8,000 to 300,000 employees or more. They cut across sectors and businesses from automobiles to pharma and everything else in between. General Motors Institute, Caterpillar, Unilever, GDF Suez, Veolia, Axa, Sanofi, Novartis, Petronas, and many more.

In 1993, corporate universities existed in only 400 companies. By 2001, this number had increased to 2,000, including Walt Disney, Boeing, and Motorola. According to BCG, there are estimated to be more than 4,000 companies with formal corporate universities.

Scale: McDonalds serves 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets. This complexity requires training. That ensures that McDonalds burgers taste the same from Mumbai to Moscow.

Complexity: When surgeons move to the operating theater they rely on checklists. These lists reduce human error, and help the surgeon to operate with speed without having to stop and double check if they are missing any step. In performing complex tasks through collaborating teams, speed comes through training in standard processes and procedures. Apple University teaches employees that they’re at the company to be the very best at one specific task.

Corporate Governance: Governance needs the ability to manage reporting relationships, finances, and facilities. Compliance and risk management demand investments in training. On any given day two billion people use Unilever products across countries that have different rules and regulations. This scale and complexity demands constant investment to ensure standards are not compromised.

Education: Entry-level hires are drawn from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. There is a need to bring people to a common minimum level of knowledge and skills. From technical skills or domain knowledge or personal competencies, people need to keep upgrading.

Values and Culture: The leaders need to be role models of the values the company proclaims. When the majority of employee responses to everyday situations become uniform, it forms the culture of the organization. Tying the professional development to strategic challenges is a strong reason to invest in training.
The culture of the organization has to support its vision and strategy. This needs a place when people can come together and connect with others and learn. Technical training can be delivered through e-learning modules. It is the intangibles like culture that people need to learn from role models.

2)   The passage is in favor of:

I) Bringing entry level hires at par with the company peers
II) Good governance should include- managing reporting relations, finances and technical development.
III) Standardizing employee response to day-to-day challenges.


a. Only I
b. Only II
c. I and III
d. II and III
e. Only III
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: I and III

Explanation:
I. Check para 8, sentence 2
II. Check para 7, sentence 1 (technical development not mentioned)
III. Check para 9, sentence 2


View Passage

In the mid-fifties when GE was expanding its operations across the globe, the president of GE, Ralph Cordiner decided to set up a corporate university an hour away from New York spread over 59 acres. In 1956 GE offered its first course that spread over 13 weeks. Today no executive can imagine spending a full quarter of the year sitting in a classroom. While the courses that are offered at Crotonville have become shorter, the efficacy of the investment remains unquestionable. The headhunters refer to GE as a leadership factory.

GE is not alone. McDonalds set up its Hamburger University in 1961. When Steve Jobs hired Joe Podolny, the then dean of Yale to start Apple University in 2008 it made a big splash. Apple University drew faculty members including professors from universities like Yale, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford and MIT.

The trend of corporate universities is on the rise. The companies have a large employee base that ranges from 8,000 to 300,000 employees or more. They cut across sectors and businesses from automobiles to pharma and everything else in between. General Motors Institute, Caterpillar, Unilever, GDF Suez, Veolia, Axa, Sanofi, Novartis, Petronas, and many more.

In 1993, corporate universities existed in only 400 companies. By 2001, this number had increased to 2,000, including Walt Disney, Boeing, and Motorola. According to BCG, there are estimated to be more than 4,000 companies with formal corporate universities.

Scale: McDonalds serves 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets. This complexity requires training. That ensures that McDonalds burgers taste the same from Mumbai to Moscow.

Complexity: When surgeons move to the operating theater they rely on checklists. These lists reduce human error, and help the surgeon to operate with speed without having to stop and double check if they are missing any step. In performing complex tasks through collaborating teams, speed comes through training in standard processes and procedures. Apple University teaches employees that they’re at the company to be the very best at one specific task.

Corporate Governance: Governance needs the ability to manage reporting relationships, finances, and facilities. Compliance and risk management demand investments in training. On any given day two billion people use Unilever products across countries that have different rules and regulations. This scale and complexity demands constant investment to ensure standards are not compromised.

Education: Entry-level hires are drawn from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. There is a need to bring people to a common minimum level of knowledge and skills. From technical skills or domain knowledge or personal competencies, people need to keep upgrading.

Values and Culture: The leaders need to be role models of the values the company proclaims. When the majority of employee responses to everyday situations become uniform, it forms the culture of the organization. Tying the professional development to strategic challenges is a strong reason to invest in training.
The culture of the organization has to support its vision and strategy. This needs a place when people can come together and connect with others and learn. Technical training can be delivered through e-learning modules. It is the intangibles like culture that people need to learn from role models.

3)   Why are companies setting up corporate universities?

a. Because there are employees in various domains and the leaders too are experts in each domain.
b. Because there are millions of employees and these universities can earn a huge profit.
c. Because there are challenges of scale and complexity and good governance issues that can be addressed through corporate training.
d. Because academic education does not help the new hires in their job.
e. Because e-learning is the fastest and most reliable method to teach everything from technology to culture.
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Because there are challenges of scale and complexity and good governance issues that can be addressed through corporate training.

Explanation:
a. There is no mention anywhere of company leaders being domain experts
b. Profits from universities are not mentioned anywhere
c. Look at paragraphs 5,6 and 7
d. Para 8 does talk about bringing entry level hires at par with company peers. But the passage does not say that academic education does not help at all.


View Passage

In the mid-fifties when GE was expanding its operations across the globe, the president of GE, Ralph Cordiner decided to set up a corporate university an hour away from New York spread over 59 acres. In 1956 GE offered its first course that spread over 13 weeks. Today no executive can imagine spending a full quarter of the year sitting in a classroom. While the courses that are offered at Crotonville have become shorter, the efficacy of the investment remains unquestionable. The headhunters refer to GE as a leadership factory.

GE is not alone. McDonalds set up its Hamburger University in 1961. When Steve Jobs hired Joe Podolny, the then dean of Yale to start Apple University in 2008 it made a big splash. Apple University drew faculty members including professors from universities like Yale, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford and MIT.

The trend of corporate universities is on the rise. The companies have a large employee base that ranges from 8,000 to 300,000 employees or more. They cut across sectors and businesses from automobiles to pharma and everything else in between. General Motors Institute, Caterpillar, Unilever, GDF Suez, Veolia, Axa, Sanofi, Novartis, Petronas, and many more.

In 1993, corporate universities existed in only 400 companies. By 2001, this number had increased to 2,000, including Walt Disney, Boeing, and Motorola. According to BCG, there are estimated to be more than 4,000 companies with formal corporate universities.

Scale: McDonalds serves 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets. This complexity requires training. That ensures that McDonalds burgers taste the same from Mumbai to Moscow.

Complexity: When surgeons move to the operating theater they rely on checklists. These lists reduce human error, and help the surgeon to operate with speed without having to stop and double check if they are missing any step. In performing complex tasks through collaborating teams, speed comes through training in standard processes and procedures. Apple University teaches employees that they’re at the company to be the very best at one specific task.

Corporate Governance: Governance needs the ability to manage reporting relationships, finances, and facilities. Compliance and risk management demand investments in training. On any given day two billion people use Unilever products across countries that have different rules and regulations. This scale and complexity demands constant investment to ensure standards are not compromised.

Education: Entry-level hires are drawn from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. There is a need to bring people to a common minimum level of knowledge and skills. From technical skills or domain knowledge or personal competencies, people need to keep upgrading.

Values and Culture: The leaders need to be role models of the values the company proclaims. When the majority of employee responses to everyday situations become uniform, it forms the culture of the organization. Tying the professional development to strategic challenges is a strong reason to invest in training.
The culture of the organization has to support its vision and strategy. This needs a place when people can come together and connect with others and learn. Technical training can be delivered through e-learning modules. It is the intangibles like culture that people need to learn from role models.

4)   According to the author, what could be a good reason to invest in the training

a. Strategic growth can be brought about by professional development.
b. To keep up with the rest of the big companies.
c. Corporate universities are a booming industry.
d. Because even small companies need growth.
e. Because a small amount of investment can bring huge profits.
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Strategic growth can be brought about by professional development.

Explanation:
Check para 9, last sentence


View Passage

In the mid-fifties when GE was expanding its operations across the globe, the president of GE, Ralph Cordiner decided to set up a corporate university an hour away from New York spread over 59 acres. In 1956 GE offered its first course that spread over 13 weeks. Today no executive can imagine spending a full quarter of the year sitting in a classroom. While the courses that are offered at Crotonville have become shorter, the efficacy of the investment remains unquestionable. The headhunters refer to GE as a leadership factory.

GE is not alone. McDonalds set up its Hamburger University in 1961. When Steve Jobs hired Joe Podolny, the then dean of Yale to start Apple University in 2008 it made a big splash. Apple University drew faculty members including professors from universities like Yale, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford and MIT.

The trend of corporate universities is on the rise. The companies have a large employee base that ranges from 8,000 to 300,000 employees or more. They cut across sectors and businesses from automobiles to pharma and everything else in between. General Motors Institute, Caterpillar, Unilever, GDF Suez, Veolia, Axa, Sanofi, Novartis, Petronas, and many more.

In 1993, corporate universities existed in only 400 companies. By 2001, this number had increased to 2,000, including Walt Disney, Boeing, and Motorola. According to BCG, there are estimated to be more than 4,000 companies with formal corporate universities.

Scale: McDonalds serves 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets. This complexity requires training. That ensures that McDonalds burgers taste the same from Mumbai to Moscow.

Complexity: When surgeons move to the operating theater they rely on checklists. These lists reduce human error, and help the surgeon to operate with speed without having to stop and double check if they are missing any step. In performing complex tasks through collaborating teams, speed comes through training in standard processes and procedures. Apple University teaches employees that they’re at the company to be the very best at one specific task.

Corporate Governance: Governance needs the ability to manage reporting relationships, finances, and facilities. Compliance and risk management demand investments in training. On any given day two billion people use Unilever products across countries that have different rules and regulations. This scale and complexity demands constant investment to ensure standards are not compromised.

Education: Entry-level hires are drawn from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. There is a need to bring people to a common minimum level of knowledge and skills. From technical skills or domain knowledge or personal competencies, people need to keep upgrading.

Values and Culture: The leaders need to be role models of the values the company proclaims. When the majority of employee responses to everyday situations become uniform, it forms the culture of the organization. Tying the professional development to strategic challenges is a strong reason to invest in training.
The culture of the organization has to support its vision and strategy. This needs a place when people can come together and connect with others and learn. Technical training can be delivered through e-learning modules. It is the intangibles like culture that people need to learn from role models.

5)   Choose the word/ phrase which is most similar in meaning to the given word.

Efficacy


a. Effectiveness
b. Monetary returns
c. Need
d. Futility
e. Tenure
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Effectiveness

Explanation:
For Eg: The efficacy of the medicine, i.e., its ability to cure the patient, has been proved over the trial period.


View Passage

In the mid-fifties when GE was expanding its operations across the globe, the president of GE, Ralph Cordiner decided to set up a corporate university an hour away from New York spread over 59 acres. In 1956 GE offered its first course that spread over 13 weeks. Today no executive can imagine spending a full quarter of the year sitting in a classroom. While the courses that are offered at Crotonville have become shorter, the efficacy of the investment remains unquestionable. The headhunters refer to GE as a leadership factory.

GE is not alone. McDonalds set up its Hamburger University in 1961. When Steve Jobs hired Joe Podolny, the then dean of Yale to start Apple University in 2008 it made a big splash. Apple University drew faculty members including professors from universities like Yale, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford and MIT.

The trend of corporate universities is on the rise. The companies have a large employee base that ranges from 8,000 to 300,000 employees or more. They cut across sectors and businesses from automobiles to pharma and everything else in between. General Motors Institute, Caterpillar, Unilever, GDF Suez, Veolia, Axa, Sanofi, Novartis, Petronas, and many more.

In 1993, corporate universities existed in only 400 companies. By 2001, this number had increased to 2,000, including Walt Disney, Boeing, and Motorola. According to BCG, there are estimated to be more than 4,000 companies with formal corporate universities.

Scale: McDonalds serves 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets. This complexity requires training. That ensures that McDonalds burgers taste the same from Mumbai to Moscow.

Complexity: When surgeons move to the operating theater they rely on checklists. These lists reduce human error, and help the surgeon to operate with speed without having to stop and double check if they are missing any step. In performing complex tasks through collaborating teams, speed comes through training in standard processes and procedures. Apple University teaches employees that they’re at the company to be the very best at one specific task.

Corporate Governance: Governance needs the ability to manage reporting relationships, finances, and facilities. Compliance and risk management demand investments in training. On any given day two billion people use Unilever products across countries that have different rules and regulations. This scale and complexity demands constant investment to ensure standards are not compromised.

Education: Entry-level hires are drawn from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. There is a need to bring people to a common minimum level of knowledge and skills. From technical skills or domain knowledge or personal competencies, people need to keep upgrading.

Values and Culture: The leaders need to be role models of the values the company proclaims. When the majority of employee responses to everyday situations become uniform, it forms the culture of the organization. Tying the professional development to strategic challenges is a strong reason to invest in training.
The culture of the organization has to support its vision and strategy. This needs a place when people can come together and connect with others and learn. Technical training can be delivered through e-learning modules. It is the intangibles like culture that people need to learn from role models.

6)   Choose the word/ phrase which is most similar in meaning to the given word.

Human error


a. The flawed logic of comparing human beings to machines
b. A term coined by psychologists meaning ‘deviation in human thought’
c. The propensity for making mistakes as a result of being human
d. Error in recognizing human potential
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: The propensity for making mistakes as a result of being human

Explanation:
Eg: Self-driving cars by Google aim to reduce road accidents by eliminating scope for human error. Since these run on technology and no human driver is required, there is no scope for human error.


View Passage

In the mid-fifties when GE was expanding its operations across the globe, the president of GE, Ralph Cordiner decided to set up a corporate university an hour away from New York spread over 59 acres. In 1956 GE offered its first course that spread over 13 weeks. Today no executive can imagine spending a full quarter of the year sitting in a classroom. While the courses that are offered at Crotonville have become shorter, the efficacy of the investment remains unquestionable. The headhunters refer to GE as a leadership factory.

GE is not alone. McDonalds set up its Hamburger University in 1961. When Steve Jobs hired Joe Podolny, the then dean of Yale to start Apple University in 2008 it made a big splash. Apple University drew faculty members including professors from universities like Yale, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford and MIT.

The trend of corporate universities is on the rise. The companies have a large employee base that ranges from 8,000 to 300,000 employees or more. They cut across sectors and businesses from automobiles to pharma and everything else in between. General Motors Institute, Caterpillar, Unilever, GDF Suez, Veolia, Axa, Sanofi, Novartis, Petronas, and many more.

In 1993, corporate universities existed in only 400 companies. By 2001, this number had increased to 2,000, including Walt Disney, Boeing, and Motorola. According to BCG, there are estimated to be more than 4,000 companies with formal corporate universities.

Scale: McDonalds serves 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets. This complexity requires training. That ensures that McDonalds burgers taste the same from Mumbai to Moscow.

Complexity: When surgeons move to the operating theater they rely on checklists. These lists reduce human error, and help the surgeon to operate with speed without having to stop and double check if they are missing any step. In performing complex tasks through collaborating teams, speed comes through training in standard processes and procedures. Apple University teaches employees that they’re at the company to be the very best at one specific task.

Corporate Governance: Governance needs the ability to manage reporting relationships, finances, and facilities. Compliance and risk management demand investments in training. On any given day two billion people use Unilever products across countries that have different rules and regulations. This scale and complexity demands constant investment to ensure standards are not compromised.

Education: Entry-level hires are drawn from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. There is a need to bring people to a common minimum level of knowledge and skills. From technical skills or domain knowledge or personal competencies, people need to keep upgrading.

Values and Culture: The leaders need to be role models of the values the company proclaims. When the majority of employee responses to everyday situations become uniform, it forms the culture of the organization. Tying the professional development to strategic challenges is a strong reason to invest in training.
The culture of the organization has to support its vision and strategy. This needs a place when people can come together and connect with others and learn. Technical training can be delivered through e-learning modules. It is the intangibles like culture that people need to learn from role models.

7)   In the context of the passage, choose the word which is most opposite in meaning to the given word.

Upgrade


a. Deteriorate
b. Elevate
c. Learn
d. Decentralize
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Deteriorate

Explanation:
Eg: There is so much competition nowadays that even doctors need to keep upgrading, i.e., learning new methods of treatment.


View Passage

In the mid-fifties when GE was expanding its operations across the globe, the president of GE, Ralph Cordiner decided to set up a corporate university an hour away from New York spread over 59 acres. In 1956 GE offered its first course that spread over 13 weeks. Today no executive can imagine spending a full quarter of the year sitting in a classroom. While the courses that are offered at Crotonville have become shorter, the efficacy of the investment remains unquestionable. The headhunters refer to GE as a leadership factory.

GE is not alone. McDonalds set up its Hamburger University in 1961. When Steve Jobs hired Joe Podolny, the then dean of Yale to start Apple University in 2008 it made a big splash. Apple University drew faculty members including professors from universities like Yale, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford and MIT.

The trend of corporate universities is on the rise. The companies have a large employee base that ranges from 8,000 to 300,000 employees or more. They cut across sectors and businesses from automobiles to pharma and everything else in between. General Motors Institute, Caterpillar, Unilever, GDF Suez, Veolia, Axa, Sanofi, Novartis, Petronas, and many more.

In 1993, corporate universities existed in only 400 companies. By 2001, this number had increased to 2,000, including Walt Disney, Boeing, and Motorola. According to BCG, there are estimated to be more than 4,000 companies with formal corporate universities.

Scale: McDonalds serves 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets. This complexity requires training. That ensures that McDonalds burgers taste the same from Mumbai to Moscow.

Complexity: When surgeons move to the operating theater they rely on checklists. These lists reduce human error, and help the surgeon to operate with speed without having to stop and double check if they are missing any step. In performing complex tasks through collaborating teams, speed comes through training in standard processes and procedures. Apple University teaches employees that they’re at the company to be the very best at one specific task.

Corporate Governance: Governance needs the ability to manage reporting relationships, finances, and facilities. Compliance and risk management demand investments in training. On any given day two billion people use Unilever products across countries that have different rules and regulations. This scale and complexity demands constant investment to ensure standards are not compromised.

Education: Entry-level hires are drawn from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. There is a need to bring people to a common minimum level of knowledge and skills. From technical skills or domain knowledge or personal competencies, people need to keep upgrading.

Values and Culture: The leaders need to be role models of the values the company proclaims. When the majority of employee responses to everyday situations become uniform, it forms the culture of the organization. Tying the professional development to strategic challenges is a strong reason to invest in training.
The culture of the organization has to support its vision and strategy. This needs a place when people can come together and connect with others and learn. Technical training can be delivered through e-learning modules. It is the intangibles like culture that people need to learn from role models.

8)   In the context of the passage, choose the word which is most opposite in meaning to the given word.

Intangible


a. Priceless
b. Ambivalent
c. Transparent
d. Cheap
e. Definite
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Definite

Explanation:
Eg: There is a quality about her that draws me to her; it is something intangible, something I cannot put a finger on.


View Passage

In the mid-fifties when GE was expanding its operations across the globe, the president of GE, Ralph Cordiner decided to set up a corporate university an hour away from New York spread over 59 acres. In 1956 GE offered its first course that spread over 13 weeks. Today no executive can imagine spending a full quarter of the year sitting in a classroom. While the courses that are offered at Crotonville have become shorter, the efficacy of the investment remains unquestionable. The headhunters refer to GE as a leadership factory.

GE is not alone. McDonalds set up its Hamburger University in 1961. When Steve Jobs hired Joe Podolny, the then dean of Yale to start Apple University in 2008 it made a big splash. Apple University drew faculty members including professors from universities like Yale, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford and MIT.

The trend of corporate universities is on the rise. The companies have a large employee base that ranges from 8,000 to 300,000 employees or more. They cut across sectors and businesses from automobiles to pharma and everything else in between. General Motors Institute, Caterpillar, Unilever, GDF Suez, Veolia, Axa, Sanofi, Novartis, Petronas, and many more.

In 1993, corporate universities existed in only 400 companies. By 2001, this number had increased to 2,000, including Walt Disney, Boeing, and Motorola. According to BCG, there are estimated to be more than 4,000 companies with formal corporate universities.

Scale: McDonalds serves 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets. This complexity requires training. That ensures that McDonalds burgers taste the same from Mumbai to Moscow.

Complexity: When surgeons move to the operating theater they rely on checklists. These lists reduce human error, and help the surgeon to operate with speed without having to stop and double check if they are missing any step. In performing complex tasks through collaborating teams, speed comes through training in standard processes and procedures. Apple University teaches employees that they’re at the company to be the very best at one specific task.

Corporate Governance: Governance needs the ability to manage reporting relationships, finances, and facilities. Compliance and risk management demand investments in training. On any given day two billion people use Unilever products across countries that have different rules and regulations. This scale and complexity demands constant investment to ensure standards are not compromised.

Education: Entry-level hires are drawn from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. There is a need to bring people to a common minimum level of knowledge and skills. From technical skills or domain knowledge or personal competencies, people need to keep upgrading.

Values and Culture: The leaders need to be role models of the values the company proclaims. When the majority of employee responses to everyday situations become uniform, it forms the culture of the organization. Tying the professional development to strategic challenges is a strong reason to invest in training.
The culture of the organization has to support its vision and strategy. This needs a place when people can come together and connect with others and learn. Technical training can be delivered through e-learning modules. It is the intangibles like culture that people need to learn from role models.

9)   What, according to the author, do you think is the main challenge of increasing scale?

a. The main challenge is to engage an increasing number of employees for handling the scaled up operations.
b. The main challenge is to break down the complex operation into simple steps.
c. The main challenge is to train the employees involved in the large scale operations.
d. The main challenge is to maintain a consistency of output quality.
e. Not clearly mentioned.
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: The main challenge is to maintain a consistency of output quality.

Explanation:
Check para 5, sentence 3
See para 3, sentence 1 & 2


View Passage

In the mid-fifties when GE was expanding its operations across the globe, the president of GE, Ralph Cordiner decided to set up a corporate university an hour away from New York spread over 59 acres. In 1956 GE offered its first course that spread over 13 weeks. Today no executive can imagine spending a full quarter of the year sitting in a classroom. While the courses that are offered at Crotonville have become shorter, the efficacy of the investment remains unquestionable. The headhunters refer to GE as a leadership factory.

GE is not alone. McDonalds set up its Hamburger University in 1961. When Steve Jobs hired Joe Podolny, the then dean of Yale to start Apple University in 2008 it made a big splash. Apple University drew faculty members including professors from universities like Yale, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford and MIT.

The trend of corporate universities is on the rise. The companies have a large employee base that ranges from 8,000 to 300,000 employees or more. They cut across sectors and businesses from automobiles to pharma and everything else in between. General Motors Institute, Caterpillar, Unilever, GDF Suez, Veolia, Axa, Sanofi, Novartis, Petronas, and many more.

In 1993, corporate universities existed in only 400 companies. By 2001, this number had increased to 2,000, including Walt Disney, Boeing, and Motorola. According to BCG, there are estimated to be more than 4,000 companies with formal corporate universities.

Scale: McDonalds serves 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets. This complexity requires training. That ensures that McDonalds burgers taste the same from Mumbai to Moscow.

Complexity: When surgeons move to the operating theater they rely on checklists. These lists reduce human error, and help the surgeon to operate with speed without having to stop and double check if they are missing any step. In performing complex tasks through collaborating teams, speed comes through training in standard processes and procedures. Apple University teaches employees that they’re at the company to be the very best at one specific task.

Corporate Governance: Governance needs the ability to manage reporting relationships, finances, and facilities. Compliance and risk management demand investments in training. On any given day two billion people use Unilever products across countries that have different rules and regulations. This scale and complexity demands constant investment to ensure standards are not compromised.

Education: Entry-level hires are drawn from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. There is a need to bring people to a common minimum level of knowledge and skills. From technical skills or domain knowledge or personal competencies, people need to keep upgrading.

Values and Culture: The leaders need to be role models of the values the company proclaims. When the majority of employee responses to everyday situations become uniform, it forms the culture of the organization. Tying the professional development to strategic challenges is a strong reason to invest in training.
The culture of the organization has to support its vision and strategy. This needs a place when people can come together and connect with others and learn. Technical training can be delivered through e-learning modules. It is the intangibles like culture that people need to learn from role models.

10)   What does Apple University teach the employees of Apple?

a. That they need to have superior communication skills.
b. That since they work at one of the biggest brands of the world, they cannot afford to make an error.
c. That they need to master every skill.
d. That they need to be the very best in the work they do.
e. That the importance of the task assigned to them cannot be stressed enough.
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: That they need to be the very best in the work they do.

Explanation:
Check para 6, last sentence


11)   In the sentence given below a part is underlined and for that part options are given. Choose the most suitable option that can replace the underlined part.

A sharp fall in prices of jute have led the poor jute farmers to the brink of starvation.


a. has led the poor jute farmers
b. have lead the poor jute farmers
c. has lead the pure jute farmers
d. have lead the poor farmers of jute
e. no correction required
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: has led the poor jute farmers

Explanation:
‘Fall’ is singular. Hence, it will use ‘has led’.


12)   In the sentence given below a part is underlined and for that part options are given. Choose the most suitable option that can replace the underlined part.

Inspite mother’s milk is vital to a child’s health, many FMCG companies wrongly advertise artificially prepared infant formulas as being the best for the child.


a. Inspite milk of the mother
b. Mother’s milk
c. Though mother’s milk
d. Despite mother’s milk
e. no correction required
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Though mother’s milk

Explanation:
We should write ‘Though mother’s milk…’ or ‘Inspite of the fact that mother’s milk…’ or ‘Despite the fact that mother’s milk….’


13)   In the sentence given below a part is underlined and for that part options are given. Choose the most suitable option that can replace the underlined part.

The meeting with the charismatic zonal manager as the annual performance day approached, provided the salespeople with the so-needed boost


a. very-needed
b. needy
c. so-needful
d. much-needed
e. no correction required
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: so-needful

Explanation:
When something is needed very much we say it is ‘much-needed’.


14)   The given sentence have been divided into parts out of which a part may contain grammatical error. Choose the part which has grammatical error or else choose ‘No error’ as your answer.

Unlawful universities for professional courses(a)/ are today a boom industry (b)/ fuelled by the ambition of parents (c)/ who wish to see their children become a doctor or an engineer at any cost (d). No error (e)


a. a
b. b
c. c
d. d
e. No error
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: b

Explanation:
Booming


15)   The given sentence have been divided into parts out of which a part may contain grammatical error. Choose the part which has grammatical error or else choose ‘No error’ as your answer.

Much is the amount of pressure (a)/ in the top ranking engineering colleges (b)/ that many students (c)/ drop out mid-way (d)/ No error (e)


a. a
b. b
c. c
d. d
e. No error
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: a

Explanation:
‘So much is the ..’


View Passage

I first got to know about the Arctic circle in my Geography class when I was 12 years old. The …(a)… of a land where the sun never sets was fascinating. I cannot remember what exactly made me so …(b)…. about this phenomenon, but I can recall myself …(c)… about places where I can witness one. The beauty of Norway enthralled me in no time and it became number one on my travel bucket list.

When I was starting out to travel around the world for a year in April 2014, I …(d) Scandinavia from the list. Too expensive, I thought. Two months later, when I was traveling in Poland, I realized it would be a shame to come so close to Norway and yet not see its many wonders. So I booked the train reservation and headed for Norway for a few days.
Norway did not …(e)…. The majestic mountains, stunning landscapes, famous fjords, stunning cities and tiny islands of wonder-there was so much to explore in Norway.

16)   In the above passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each five words are suggested.

Choose the one that fills the blank numbered 'a' most appropriately.


a. Thought
b. Idea
c. Concept
d. Imagination
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Idea

Explanation:
‘The idea of’ is generally followed by a noun or noun phrase. ‘The thought of ‘ is generally followed by an –ing word. For example: The thought of jumping gave me the shivers. Since the author had never been there it was not the existence itself, but the idea of such a land existing that the author found fascinating. ‘Concept’ and ‘imagination’ are inappropriate in this context.


View Passage

I first got to know about the Arctic circle in my Geography class when I was 12 years old. The …(a)… of a land where the sun never sets was fascinating. I cannot remember what exactly made me so …(b)…. about this phenomenon, but I can recall myself …(c)… about places where I can witness one. The beauty of Norway enthralled me in no time and it became number one on my travel bucket list.

When I was starting out to travel around the world for a year in April 2014, I …(d) Scandinavia from the list. Too expensive, I thought. Two months later, when I was traveling in Poland, I realized it would be a shame to come so close to Norway and yet not see its many wonders. So I booked the train reservation and headed for Norway for a few days.
Norway did not …(e)…. The majestic mountains, stunning landscapes, famous fjords, stunning cities and tiny islands of wonder-there was so much to explore in Norway.

17)   In the above passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each five words are suggested.

Choose the one that fills the blank numbered 'b' most appropriately.


a. Curious
b. Relieved
c. Keen
d. Perplexed
e. Nosy
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Curious

Explanation:
When she came to know about this phenomenon it made her curious. A person is ‘keen on’ something.


View Passage

I first got to know about the Arctic circle in my Geography class when I was 12 years old. The …(a)… of a land where the sun never sets was fascinating. I cannot remember what exactly made me so …(b)…. about this phenomenon, but I can recall myself …(c)… about places where I can witness one. The beauty of Norway enthralled me in no time and it became number one on my travel bucket list.

When I was starting out to travel around the world for a year in April 2014, I …(d) Scandinavia from the list. Too expensive, I thought. Two months later, when I was traveling in Poland, I realized it would be a shame to come so close to Norway and yet not see its many wonders. So I booked the train reservation and headed for Norway for a few days.
Norway did not …(e)…. The majestic mountains, stunning landscapes, famous fjords, stunning cities and tiny islands of wonder-there was so much to explore in Norway.

18)   In the above passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each five words are suggested.

Choose the one that fills the blank numbered 'c' most appropriately.


a. Looking up
b. Researching
c. Reviewing
d. Assessing
e. Analysing
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Researching

Explanation:
The author is curious about the phenomenon, hence she is researching about places where it can be witnessed. ‘Looking up’ is not followed by ‘about’. Reviewing, assessing and analyzing are incorrect in this context. Review, assess and analyze are more appropriate there is a plan to follow them up with some real action.


View Passage

I first got to know about the Arctic circle in my Geography class when I was 12 years old. The …(a)… of a land where the sun never sets was fascinating. I cannot remember what exactly made me so …(b)…. about this phenomenon, but I can recall myself …(c)… about places where I can witness one. The beauty of Norway enthralled me in no time and it became number one on my travel bucket list.

When I was starting out to travel around the world for a year in April 2014, I …(d) Scandinavia from the list. Too expensive, I thought. Two months later, when I was traveling in Poland, I realized it would be a shame to come so close to Norway and yet not see its many wonders. So I booked the train reservation and headed for Norway for a few days.
Norway did not …(e)…. The majestic mountains, stunning landscapes, famous fjords, stunning cities and tiny islands of wonder-there was so much to explore in Norway.

19)   In the above passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each five words are suggested.

Choose the one that fills the blank numbered 'd' most appropriately.


a. Criss-crossed
b. Added
c. Crossed
d. Deducted
e. Subtracted
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Crossed

Explanation:
Read the following sentence. Scandinavia is too expensive. Hence, she cancelled or ‘crossed’ it from her list. You cannot ‘deduct’ or ‘subtract’ items from a list.


View Passage

I first got to know about the Arctic circle in my Geography class when I was 12 years old. The …(a)… of a land where the sun never sets was fascinating. I cannot remember what exactly made me so …(b)…. about this phenomenon, but I can recall myself …(c)… about places where I can witness one. The beauty of Norway enthralled me in no time and it became number one on my travel bucket list.

When I was starting out to travel around the world for a year in April 2014, I …(d) Scandinavia from the list. Too expensive, I thought. Two months later, when I was traveling in Poland, I realized it would be a shame to come so close to Norway and yet not see its many wonders. So I booked the train reservation and headed for Norway for a few days.
Norway did not …(e)…. The majestic mountains, stunning landscapes, famous fjords, stunning cities and tiny islands of wonder-there was so much to explore in Norway.

20)   In the above passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each five words are suggested.

Choose the one that fills the blank numbered 'e' most appropriately.


a. Disgruntle
b. Disappoint
c. Frustrate
d. Depress
e. Satisfy
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Disappoint

Explanation:
Norway was beautiful. So it did not disappoint. Disgruntle, frustrate and depress carry stronger meanings that do not apply here.


View Passage

I. Fresh from college he was only twenty-one and Rose was sweet seventeen.

II. They must have met and exchanged letters which are not forthcoming.

III. The budding poet was drawn by her grace and vivaciousness.

IV. Daughter of an English baron, Rose Aylmer lost her father early and was living with her mother and sister in a town in South Wales when Walter London met her.

V. Soon after Rose Aylmer proceeded to India with her relatives to visit her aunt, wife of Sir Henry Russel, judge of the Supreme Court of Calcutta.

VI. Rose suddenly died of an attack of cholera and had to be interred in Calcutta only.

21)   Rearrange the above sentences to form a meaningful paragraph and answer the question given below.

Which of the above should be the THIRD sentence of the paragraph?


a. I
b. II
c. III
d. IV
e. VI
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: III

Explanation:
The correct sequence is as follows:

IV. Daughter of an English baron, Rose Aylmer lost her father early and was living with her mother and sister in a town in South Wales when Walter London met her.

I. Fresh from college he was only twenty-one and Rose was sweet seventeen.

III. The budding poet was drawn by her grace and vivaciousness.

II. They must have met and exchanged letters which are not forthcoming.

V. Soon after Rose Aylmer proceeded to India with her relatives to visit her aunt, wife of Sir Henry Russel, judge of the Supreme Court of Calcutta.

VI. Rose suddenly died of an attack of cholera and had to be interred in Calcutta only.


View Passage

I. Fresh from college he was only twenty-one and Rose was sweet seventeen.

II. They must have met and exchanged letters which are not forthcoming.

III. The budding poet was drawn by her grace and vivaciousness.

IV. Daughter of an English baron, Rose Aylmer lost her father early and was living with her mother and sister in a town in South Wales when Walter London met her.

V. Soon after Rose Aylmer proceeded to India with her relatives to visit her aunt, wife of Sir Henry Russel, judge of the Supreme Court of Calcutta.

VI. Rose suddenly died of an attack of cholera and had to be interred in Calcutta only.

22)   Rearrange the above sentences to form a meaningful paragraph and answer the questions given below.

Which of the above should be the SECOND sentence of the paragraph?


a. I
b. II
c. III
d. IV
e. VI
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: I

Explanation:
The correct sequence is as follows:

IV. Daughter of an English baron, Rose Aylmer lost her father early and was living with her mother and sister in a town in South Wales when Walter London met her.

I. Fresh from college he was only twenty-one and Rose was sweet seventeen.

III. The budding poet was drawn by her grace and vivaciousness.

II. They must have met and exchanged letters which are not forthcoming.

V. Soon after Rose Aylmer proceeded to India with her relatives to visit her aunt, wife of Sir Henry Russel, judge of the Supreme Court of Calcutta.

VI. Rose suddenly died of an attack of cholera and had to be interred in Calcutta only.


View Passage

I. Fresh from college he was only twenty-one and Rose was sweet seventeen.

II. They must have met and exchanged letters which are not forthcoming.

III. The budding poet was drawn by her grace and vivaciousness.

IV. Daughter of an English baron, Rose Aylmer lost her father early and was living with her mother and sister in a town in South Wales when Walter London met her.

V. Soon after Rose Aylmer proceeded to India with her relatives to visit her aunt, wife of Sir Henry Russel, judge of the Supreme Court of Calcutta.

VI. Rose suddenly died of an attack of cholera and had to be interred in Calcutta only.

23)   Rearrange the above sentences to form a meaningful paragraph and answer the question given below.

Which of the above should be the FIFTH sentence of the paragraph?


a. II
b. III
c. IV
d. V
e. VI
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: V

Explanation:
The correct sequence is as follows:

IV. Daughter of an English baron, Rose Aylmer lost her father early and was living with her mother and sister in a town in South Wales when Walter London met her.

I. Fresh from college he was only twenty-one and Rose was sweet seventeen.

III. The budding poet was drawn by her grace and vivaciousness.

II. They must have met and exchanged letters which are not forthcoming.

V. Soon after Rose Aylmer proceeded to India with her relatives to visit her aunt, wife of Sir Henry Russel, judge of the Supreme Court of Calcutta.

VI. Rose suddenly died of an attack of cholera and had to be interred in Calcutta only.


View Passage

I. Fresh from college he was only twenty-one and Rose was sweet seventeen.

II. They must have met and exchanged letters which are not forthcoming.

III. The budding poet was drawn by her grace and vivaciousness.

IV. Daughter of an English baron, Rose Aylmer lost her father early and was living with her mother and sister in a town in South Wales when Walter London met her.

V. Soon after Rose Aylmer proceeded to India with her relatives to visit her aunt, wife of Sir Henry Russel, judge of the Supreme Court of Calcutta.

VI. Rose suddenly died of an attack of cholera and had to be interred in Calcutta only.

24)   Rearrange the above sentences to form a meaningful paragraph and answer the question given below.

Which of these should be the LAST sentence of the paragraph?


a. I
b. II
c. III
d. V
e. VI
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: VI

Explanation:
The correct sequence is as follows:

IV. Daughter of an English baron, Rose Aylmer lost her father early and was living with her mother and sister in a town in South Wales when Walter London met her.

I. Fresh from college he was only twenty-one and Rose was sweet seventeen.

III. The budding poet was drawn by her grace and vivaciousness.

II. They must have met and exchanged letters which are not forthcoming.

V. Soon after Rose Aylmer proceeded to India with her relatives to visit her aunt, wife of Sir Henry Russel, judge of the Supreme Court of Calcutta.

VI. Rose suddenly died of an attack of cholera and had to be interred in Calcutta only.


View Passage

I. Fresh from college he was only twenty-one and Rose was sweet seventeen.

II. They must have met and exchanged letters which are not forthcoming.

III. The budding poet was drawn by her grace and vivaciousness.

IV. Daughter of an English baron, Rose Aylmer lost her father early and was living with her mother and sister in a town in South Wales when Walter London met her.

V. Soon after Rose Aylmer proceeded to India with her relatives to visit her aunt, wife of Sir Henry Russel, judge of the Supreme Court of Calcutta.

VI. Rose suddenly died of an attack of cholera and had to be interred in Calcutta only.

25)   Rearrange the above sentences to form a meaningful paragraph and answer the question given below.

Which of these should be the FOURTH sentence of the paragraph?


a. I
b. II
c. III
d. V
e. VI
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: II

Explanation:
The correct sequence is as follows:

IV. Daughter of an English baron, Rose Aylmer lost her father early and was living with her mother and sister in a town in South Wales when Walter London met her.

I. Fresh from college he was only twenty-one and Rose was sweet seventeen.

III. The budding poet was drawn by her grace and vivaciousness.

II. They must have met and exchanged letters which are not forthcoming.

V. Soon after Rose Aylmer proceeded to India with her relatives to visit her aunt, wife of Sir Henry Russel, judge of the Supreme Court of Calcutta.

VI. Rose suddenly died of an attack of cholera and had to be interred in Calcutta only.


26)   There are two sentences. Each sentence has a blank in it. Five options are given below the sentence pair. Choose the option that fits both the blanks.

She was an elegant ……. dancer.

He has ambitious plans of making a trip to the North …….


a. Classical
b. Pole
c. Zone
d. Hemisphere
e. Ballet
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Pole

Explanation:
Pole dancing is a form of dance where dancers dance centered around a pole.

The North Pole is the extreme northern end of the earth.


27)   There are two sentences. Each sentence has a blank in it. Five options are given below the sentence pair. Choose the option that fits both the blanks.

Maggi has been withdrawn from markets on account of rumors of ..….poisoning.

Hormonal imbalance can often ….. to depression.


a. Children
b. Food
c. Lead
d. Take
e. Direct
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Lead

Explanation:
Lead (n) is a chemical element that when consumed can be poisonous. Lead (v) means to guide in the direction of something.


28)   There are two sentences. Each sentence has a blank in it. Five options are given below the sentence pair. Choose the option that fits both the blanks.

A …. has been buzzing near my ears all afternoon.

Kites ……. very high in the sky.


a. Fly
b. Mosquito
c. Soar
d. Insect
e. Rise
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Fly

Explanation:
A fly (n) is a small flying insect. To fly(v) means to move through air usually using wings.


29)   There are two sentences. Each sentence has a blank in it. Five options are given below the sentence pair. Choose the option that fits both the blanks.

Never …… your friends when they need you the most.

They spent a week in the …… without any food or water.


a. Belittle
b. Dump
c. Forest
d. Desert
e. House
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Desert

Explanation:
A desert(n) is a dry arid full of sand. To desert (v) someone is to leave him unjustly, without any hope of return.


30)   There are two sentences. Each sentence has a blank in it. Five options are given below the sentence pair. Choose the option that fits both the blanks.

…. he know that there has been a theft at his place?

The little boy stood looking at the ..…..grazing in the distance.


a. Did
b. Does
c. Cows
d. Would
e. Horses
Answer  Explanation 

ANSWER: Does

Explanation:
‘Does’ is the third person singular of the verb ‘do’. ‘Does’ is also the plural of doe, a female deer.